Getting Started

getting started 103556822

Housetraining
The key to training your dog to eliminate outside (where you want him to) is to prevent accidents, and to reward success. Adult dogs have better bladder and bowel control, and can “hold it” for a longer period of time than puppies. The rule of thumb with puppies is to take their age in months, add one, and that’s the number of hours the puppy can “hold it” during the day (i.e. A four-month-old puppy can be expected to be clean for up to five hours during the day).
Here are some simple steps to help you and your dog find success!

•    Feed your dog on a schedule (he’ll eliminate on a schedule, too).
•    Keep his diet simple and consistent (avoid table scraps and a high quality dry kibble).
•    Choose an area, about ten square feet, outside, where you wish for your dog to potty.
•    Take your dog on leash to the area, pace back and forth (movement promotes movement) and chant an encouraging phrase (“do your business, do your business “).
•    Do this for no more than three minutes:
    o    if he eliminates, give huge amounts of praise and play.
    o    if he doesn’t eliminate, keep him on leash, go back indoors, keep dog on leash with you or confined in a crate.
•    Try again in an hour; eventually your dog will eliminate appropriately and you cangive huge amounts of praise and play.
 
REMEMBER! Do not punish accidents! Ignore them, and reward success! Pet Over Population and Owner Surrender.

Crate Training

"Private room with a view. Ideal for traveling dogs or for those who just want a secure, quiet place to hang out at home."
That's how your dog might describe his crate. It's his own personal den where he can find comfort and solitude while you know he's safe and secure—and not shredding your house while you're out running errands.

Crating philosophy

Crate training uses a dog's natural instincts as a den animal. A wild dog's den is his home, a place to sleep, hide from danger, and raise a family. The crate becomes your dog's den, an ideal spot to snooze or take refuge during a thunderstorm.
•    The primary use for a crate is housetraining. Dogs don't like to soil their dens.
•    The crate can limit access to the rest of the house while he learns other rules, like not to chew on furniture.
•    Crates are a safe way to transport your dog in the car.

Crating caution!

A crate isn't a magical solution. If not used correctly, a dog can feel trapped and frustrated.
•    Never use the crate as a punishment. Your dog will come to fear it and refuse to enter it.
•    Don't leave your dog in the crate too long.  A dog that’s crated day and night doesn't get enough exercise or human interaction and can become depressed or anxious. You may have to change your schedule, hire a pet sitter, or take your dog to a doggie daycare facility to reduce the amount of time he must spend in his crate every day.
•    Puppies under six months of age shouldn't stay in a crate for more than three or four hours at a time. They can't control their bladders and bowels for that long.  The same goes for adult dogs that are being housetrained.  Physically, they can hold it, but they don’t know they’re supposed to.
•    Crate your dog only until you can trust him not to destroy the house. After that, it should be a place he goes voluntarily.

Why You Should Spay or Neuter Your Pet

Spaying or neutering your pet is an important decision for pet owners. As animal lovers who value our pets, it is important to understand the impact of this decision. 

It happens everywhere

In every community, in every state, there are homeless animals. In the U.S. as a whole, there are an estimated 6-8 million homeless animals entering animal shelters every year. About half of these animals are adopted, and tragically, the other half are euthanized. These are healthy, sweet pets who would have made great companions.

The number of homeless animals varies by state—in some states there are as many as 300,000 homeless animals euthanized in animal shelters every year. These are not the offspring of homeless "street" animals—these are the puppies and kittens of cherished family pets and even purebreds.

Yes, your pet's offspring could be shelter animals

Many people believe that their pet's puppies or kittens would never become homeless shelter animals. But the reality is that every time the dog finds his way under the fence to visit the neighbor's female dog, or the indoor/outdoor cat comes back home pregnant again, the result is a litter of dogs or cats. Even if they are placed into homes, it is still possible for them to end up in shelters once they become "hard to handle," or for them to reproduce further and for the next generation of puppies or kittens to wind up homeless.

Many people are surprised to learn that nationwide more than 3 million cats and dogs are euthanized in shelters. Spay/neuter is the only permanent, 100-percent effective method of birth control for dogs and cats.

Not just for dogs and cats

When being conscientious about the pet overpopulation, don't forget to spay or neuter your pet rabbit. Rabbits reproduce faster than dogs or cats and often end up in shelters where they must be euthanized. Spaying or neutering rabbits can reduce hormone-driven behavior such as lunging, mounting, spraying and boxing. Spaying females can prevent ovarian, mammary and uterine cancers, which can be prevalent in mature females.

Millions of pet deaths each year are a needless tragedy. By spaying and neutering your pet, you can be an important part of the solution. Contact your veterinarian today and be sure to let your family and friends know that they should do the same.

JBRR’s recommendations: Each new dog reacts differently in each new environment. You should allow the newly adopted dog a proper period of adjustment time of at least two weeks without excess stimuli (i.e. Introducing to dogs or people who are not a part of the household); to keep the environment as quiet as possible for the adopted animal for said period of time; do not leave adopted pets unattended with elderly, young children or pets.

I understand that information given in no way constitutes a guarantee of my adopted pet’s behavior or health. Despite all efforts on the part of Jellystone Bark’s Rescue RANGERs they have disclosed all pertinent medical/behavioral information, additional health/behavioral issues may become evident upon examination by a veterinarian or post adoption. As the adopter, I assume all financial and medical responsibility for any further expenses, liabilities or costs the animal incurs or requires.